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Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) female \

Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) female 'Noor T39' with cubs in water. Ranthambore National Park, India © naturepl.com / Andy Rouse / WWF

Adopt a tiger

As few as 3,890 tigers remain in the wild and tragically, at least 2 are still killed each week for the illegal wildlife trade. Help save these endangered big cats - make a difference today by making a monthly donation. Your tiger adoption kit includes a plush toy, adoption certificate & more - the perfect gift.
As few as 3,890 tigers remain in the wild and tragically, at least 2 are still killed each week for the illegal wildlife trade. Help save these endangered big cats - make a difference today by making a monthly donation. Your tiger adoption kit includes a plush toy, adoption certificate & more - the perfect gift.

Tigers are one of the world's most endangered species. But you can help. By adopting a tiger you will make a real difference to the wild tiger's chance of survival. You will be helping to protect vital habitat, step up our anti-poaching efforts and monitor tiger populations.

 

Your donation:

It makes the perfect gift – with a cuddly toy tiger and a special adoption gift pack, including an adoption certificate, a stunning tiger portrait and reusable tote bag.

 

All donations of $2 or more to WWF-Australia are tax-deductible. For your convenience, we will send you one receipt at the end of the financial year, for the total amount of your tax-deductible donations. If your adoption includes a plush toy, the $15 cost for the toy is not tax-deductible.
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Two tigers (Panthera tigris) playing, India © Vivek R. Sinha / WWF

More on tigers

One hundred years ago, there may have been 100,000 wild tigers. By 2010, as few as 3,200 tigers were left in the wild. This shocking population decline of around 95% was driven by rampant poaching for their body parts and habitat loss. In 2010, the most ambitious and visionary species conservation goal was set: to double the number of wild tigers by 2022 – the next Chinese Year of the Tiger.

The latest national tiger survey estimates that global wild tiger numbers have increased to around 3,890 today. This is the first increase in tiger conservation history and a positive sign that efforts are working. However, threats against tigers still persist, and we urgently need to do more. By adopting a tiger you will make a real difference to the wild tiger’s chance of survival. You will be helping to protect vital habitat, step up our anti-poaching efforts and monitor tiger populations.

 
 
 

 

 

 

Tiger among trees, Ranthambore National Park, India © Souvik Kundu / WWF

Threats

Poaching
The most immediate threat to wild tigers is poaching. Their body parts are in relentless demand for traditional medicine and are status symbols within some Asian cultures. The resources for guarding protected areas where tigers live are usually limited.

Tiger-human conflict
People and tigers increasingly compete for space. The conflict threatens the world’s remaining wild tigers and poses a major problem for communities living in or near them.

Habitat loss
Tigers have lost 93% of their historical range. Their habitat has been destroyed, degraded and fragmented by human activities.

Why are tigers important?

In saving tigers, we also save the biologically rich and diverse landscapes in which they still roam – Asia’s last great rainforests, jungles and wild lands. These forests are home to thousands of other species, people and the food, freshwater and flood protection that local communities need to survive. Over the past century, tiger numbers have fallen by around 95% and they now survive in 40% less of the area they occupied just a decade ago. Although mostly solitary, tigers need a large territory, the size of which is determined mostly by the availability of prey.

Tracking tiger populations and understanding the threats they face is absolutely vital to protecting these magnificent big cats. They face daily hazards from poaching and habitat loss. Every part of the tiger — from its whiskers to its tail — is also traded in illegal wildlife markets, feeding a multi-billion dollar criminal network.

 

 

 

 

 

Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) in the Kanha National Park, India © Sanskar Khedekar

What we're doing

WWF works to enforce zero tolerance for tiger poaching across Asia. We've helped to create dedicated enforcement units and equip them with the best new technologies to ensure stronger law enforcement. We remain dedicated to improving the effectiveness of wildlife rangers, training personnel from enforcement agencies and empowering community patrols and enforcement networks.

 

WWF also works to protect and connect fragile tiger habitat, ensuring tigers have the landscapes they need to thrive. We focus our efforts where densities of prey and tigers are at their highest, including the corridors that link tiger habitats within landscapes. Our work includes building local capacity to manage protected areas and collaborating with our partners to manage core tiger corridors. 

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If you have any questions about your donation, please do not hesitate to contact our friendly Supporter Services team either by email: enquiries@wwf.org.au or call 1800 032 551

Share this page with your friends and family to help endangered animals even more.

 

Bengal tiger portrait (Panthera tigris tigris) Bandhavgarh NP, Madhya Pradesh, India © naturepl.com / Francois Savigny / WWF

Thanks to your generous donations we will be able to provide ongoing support to tigers by helping to:

• Reconnect fragmented areas of habitat so tigers can move between them
• Strengthen anti-poaching patrols in and around nature reserves
• Reduce illegal poaching and trade of live tigers and tiger parts
• Ensure conservation laws are enforced.

If you would like to speak with us anytime, please do not hesitate to contact our Supporter Services team by email at enquiries@wwf.org.au or call 1800 032 551.